Newest US weather satellite captures Hurricane Bill in a “full-disk” view of the Earth.

Remote-sensing scientists call a satellite image that captures an entire hemisphere of the Earth in one view a “full-disk” image. The delivery of the first full-disk image from a newly launched weather satellite is an exciting milestone in the mission. It provides scientists and engineers with incontrovertible evidence that a new satellite—as well as the communications systems needed to deliver the images back to Earth—is ready to do its job.

On August 17, 2009, at 1:31 p.m. EST, the latest NASA/NOAA geostationary weather satellite, called GOES-14, returned its first full-disk thermal infrared (IR) image, showing radiation with a wavelength of 10.7 micrometers emanating from Earth. Infrared images are useful because they provide information about temperatures. A wavelength of 10.7 micrometers is 15 times longer than the longest wavelength of light (red) that people can see, but scientists can turn the data into a picture by having a computer display cold temperatures as bright white and hot temperatures as black. The hottest (blackest) features in the scene are land surfaces; the coldest (whitest) features in the scene are clouds.

First IR Image from Newest Weather Satellite Captures Hurricane Bill

Posted August 19, 2009

First IR Image from Newest Weather Satellite Captures Hurricane Bill

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http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=39848

Source :

NASA Newest US weather satellite captures Hurricane Bill in a “full-disk” view of the Earth. http://tr.im/wGBn

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